News: This section can be used for brief news announcements
   Last Name:   First Name:
Log In
Advanced Search
Surnames
What's New
Most Wanted
Photos
Histories
Documents
Videos
Recordings
Albums
All Media
Cemeteries
Headstones
Places
Notes
Dates and Anniversaries
Reports
Sources
Repositories
Statistics
Change Language
Bookmarks
Contact Us
Register for a User Account

 Notes


HomeHome    SearchSearch    PrintPrint    Login - User: anonymousLogin    Add BookmarkAdd Bookmark

Tree:

Matches 1 to 50 of 99

      1 2 Next»

   Notes   Linked to 
1 Acte : 111320015778309099 Family: F1208
 
2 Albertina Bibler, 12 Dec 1786, to Joh[n] Martin Braun, a mason from Edesheim. at St. Michael's Lutheran Church, Germantown, Philadelphia, PA.

'Germantown - Mt. Airy Marriages 1745-1795.' 
Family: F3
 
3 In Michael's marriage record, according to Ann Sherwin's translation, his father was described as "of Vest[e]berg." It has been suggested by one researcher that the record reads "Vogtsburg." Ms. Sherwisn, a Certified German-English translator, was asked if this could be true. She vehemently stands by her translation. Ann, over the years has proven open to admission of error when she makes one, but was very stern in defense of this one.   
4 In the earliest church records of Adelsheim, Michael's name was spelled "Michel Bibler." Later, in Adelsheim and America, in church records he was called "Michael Bubler," with an umlauted "U." In a Philadlphia Gazette advertisement of 1754, his name was spelled "Michael Bibler."  
5 It has only been during the latter part of the 1990's until now, a decade, that anything substantive has been known about Johann Franciscus Bibler and Albertina Charlotha Kroh.

Early research was based on handwriting found in a book that had once belonged to Frantz Bibler, and into which he had entered family information. Researachers have had difficulty finding the location of this, likely a prayer book, and have had to rely upon four pages Only four pages have been scanned and book was translated by an amateur who had taken several years of German but clearly did not know the alphabet with which they were writing.

Like so many other immigrants, who, like they, had arrived during the peak of the Palatine Emigration, soon after their long trek had landed them here in America, they faded into the large restless crowd of Germanic people already having arrived in the colonies who had stayed in or near Philadelphia and nearby Germantown at least briefly before migrating to more isolated places where they could be among others of their ethnicity and away from an English-speaking society that so often held them in contempt.

It has been estimated that over half of German immigrants who made the trip were either redemptioners or indentured. A Redepmptiner was a person, who on behalf of themselves or their family had requested of the captain that they be allowed to pay after their arrival in America. Only when they had been unable, for a month, to pay the family's passage, were they or family members sold into servitude for a period of about four to seven years, or, in the case of a minor, until they reached adulthood.

We don't know the financial circumstances of the Bibler family at the time they immigrated, or whether they had family or friends already established and in a position to help them. Frantz's brother Friedrich, his sisters, Rosina and Albertina, as well as children Ludwig and Charlotte, were all potential servants, if the family's money had run out by the end of the journey. 
Family: F4
 
6 LDS #400452
1793
Mensis Januarius
Hammer et Biebler / Voelckersweiller

Anno Domini millesimo, Septingentesimo, Nonagesimo tertio, die Vigesima Secunda mensis januarii, premisses denunciationibus tribus dominici xxx xxx diebus continuis interpolatis tamen, quarum prima fasta est xxx Epiphanine Domini ; altera : dominica prima ; d'ultima, dominica secunda [post] Epiphaniam nullo impedimento detecto, ante (Missre) parochialis solemnia, ego Joannis Baptista Graab ad Sanctum Cyriacum Martyrem loci Gossersweiller Parochus honestum Civea et agricolam in Voelckersweiller Stephanum Hammer et honestam Mariam Annam natam Prug, viduam à defuncto Cive in codem loco Joanne Biebler relictam, parochianos meos, in Ecclesia mea parochiali interrogavi, mutroque corum consensu coram me praestito, et habito solemniter per verba de praesenti Matrimonis, junxi, praesentibus testibus notis Petro Schlosser, et Michaële Prug, civibus et agricolis in Voelckersweiller, item xxx Ita mecum testantur propria manu subscripti.
Sponsus
Sponsa ignare scribendi, apposito in hic scriptorum praesentia Sua manu Signo
Testis
Testis ignarus scribendi, apposito in hic scriptorum praesentia Sua manu Signo, xxx (Caspar ??) Prug civis ex Voelckersweiller
 
Family: F1269
 
7 Lewis spelled his own name "Ludwig Bibler," but was called Lewis Peebler in Virginia records.  
8 Mariage record n°:111320004401809099)
from CERCLE GENEALOGIQUE DE LA MOSELLE

Date: 03 Aug 1762
Place: Vescheim,Moselle,Lorraine,FRANCE

SUBJECT
Last Name: BIBLER - First Name: Jean Pierre
Father: Léonard
Mother: Barbe +GROS ( <- Barbe = Barbara ; she was dead at this time )
From: Busenberg? Palatinat

SPOUSE
Last Name: ERHARD - First Name: Madeleine
Father: +Jean Jacques
Mother: Madeleine SPECHT
More Informations: Pfalzweyer dioc.Spire 
Family: F1171
 
9 Mariage record n°:111320041495909099
from CERCLE GENEALOGIQUE DE LA MOSELLE

Date: 4 Nov 1777
Place: Lemberg,Moselle,Lorraine,FRANCE

SUBJECT
Last Name: BIBLER - First Name: Elisabeth
Father: +Léonard
Mother: Anne-Marie ZUTTER
More Informations: Volkertsweiler Palatinat D

SPOUSE
Last Name: PIERROT(PIRROT) - First Name: Thomas (20)
Father: Thomas
Mother: Barbe EILER (EYLER)

From: Lemberg 
Family: F1267
 
10 Notes witheld at moment. Family: F1
 
11 Nothing is known of Michael Bibler's mother. We do not know for certain that she was married to Michael's father. If it is true that Michael's parents were married and Michael was born in Vestenberg, it is natural to conclude that they would have been married at or near Vestenberg. Family: F1
 
12 This marriage is duplicated in the registers and appears under the date 10 May 1774 on page 99 of the first volume as well as under the date 1779 as #15 on page 115 of the second volume, with the additional information that Joanne and Michaele Brug were from Gossersweiler. Family: F139
 
13 Carol Brown has not established a maiden name for Barbara, so she should be called simply "Barbara" until more is known. Some researchers contend that her name is Lang. Barbara (Maria Barbara)
 
14 LDS 400448 :
1751
die 17 febr. moribundorum sacramentis praemunita pie in Domino obiit et die 18 sepulta est Barbara, Leonardi Bibler civis in Schwanh.

eodem obiit et sepultus adolescens Joannes Georgius prefati Leonardi Bibler legitimus filius.
 
Barbara (Maria Barbara)
 
15 "Von und Zu" or "v. u. zu" in older German records refered to a member of a noble family who resided in the town which that family controlled; technically it means "of and from."

 
Johann Friedrich Christoph von und zu Adelsheim
 
16 Ursula's February 1657 birthdate is an estimate based on information contained in her death notice. Ursula (Mohr?)
 
17 Birth date is calculated from information in her death record. Anna Salome Catharina (wife of Joh. Jeorg Adolph) Mueller
 
18 Birthdate calculated from information in death record. Anna (wife of Juste Mueller)
 
19 Hannah's parents were both Lutherans who had moved to Fairfield County, Ohio with Relatives. Hannah was probably baptized into the Lutheran Church by Michael J. Steck, whose family were friends with Hannah's mother's family in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. A look at Steck's Ohio Journal, translated by Dr. Ruff, showed nothing, but it needs to be checked again. Hannah Elizabeth Baker
 
20 Anna Mary's birth place is a supposition based on her parents' residence, derived from tax lists, deeds, and minute book entries. Anna Mary Bibler
 
21 Bibler researchers have had difficulty locating Christian Bibler after his departure from the Shenandoah Valley.
When Christian Bibler disappeared from the Shenandoah Valley he did not leave a clear and obvious trail. The only plausible explanation was that his family had adopted an Anglicized version of their surname -- Perhaps they couldn't spell it and accepted a spelling assigned them by record keepers, or perhaps the spelling caused others to pronounce Christian's name in a manner that displeased them, and they chose the sound, not caring much about the spelling.

A Christian Peavler who appeared at the end of the 18th century near Kingsport, Tennessee, was, according to family lore, born in Virginia. The closest match descendants could find in Virginia was a Peebler family in the Shenandoah Valley.

Bibler researchers had difficulty accepting the "V" in the middle of the name. Some Peavler researchers had some problems accepting "Peebler" after discovering that the actual spelling was Bibler.

A generation earlier brothers Johann Frantz and Friedrich Bibler had arrived in America aboard the same ship. Frantz lived at least until about 1757, but records have not come to light after a 1754 Philadelphia Gazette ad and his fate is unknown. Two sisters, Albertina and Rosina were married in Germantown and Philadelphia. Friedrich married and had two children baptized in eastern Pennsylvania prior to his disappearing into thin air. Coinciding closely with the disappearance of Friedrich Bibler and his wife, Maria, and children Peter and Magdalena was the appearance from nowhere of a man named Frederick Peebler and his wife Mary, whose children were named Magdalena Peveler, Peter Peveler, and Michael Peebler.

The Frederick Peebler family shows us that the letter "B" can be replaced with a "V" during the process of the Anglicization of an German name. We already know that Bibler was repeatedly spelled "Peebler" in Virginia records despite the retention of the German spelling by Lewis and Jacob Bibler.

Some damage and confusion has been done by a particular Peavler researcher who twisted facts to suit their theories and despite contact with Bibler researchers and the knowledge that Johann Frantz Bibler had recorded the birth in a book that had passed through the family for generations, insisted that Lewis Bibler was actually his siblings' father with an unknown first wife, and his own children's father from his marriage to the only wife he is known to have had. Numerous facts had to be twisted, and an older and younger Lewis Bibler created to explain the presence on a militia roll of a Lewis Bibler who couldn't have been old enough to have been his siblings' father.

Various surnames known not to have been Biblers were added to stretch and touch otherwise unreachable conclusions. None of this would need mention, but this research has penetrated Peavler genealogy causing uncertainty among anyone trying to put the family together again. With scant records and hard to find solutions added to little knowledge of the Bibler family, Peavler family members bought into parts of this story. We will now have to figure out which pieces of the puzzle are imaginary and which are real. Alice Du Pont will join us later to help untangle this mess.
 
Christian Heinrich Bibler
 
22 Bibler researchers have had difficulty locating Christian Bibler after his departure from the Shenandoah Valley.
When Christian Bibler disappeared from the Shenandoah Valley he did not leave a clear and obvious trail. The only plausible explanation was that his family had adopted an Anglicized version of their surname -- Perhaps they couldn't spell it and accepted a spelling assigned them by record keepers, or perhaps the spelling caused others to pronounce Christian's name in a manner that displeased them, and they chose the sound, not caring much about the spelling.

A Christian Peavler who appeared at the end of the 18th century near Kingsport, Tennessee, was, according to family lore, born in Virginia. The closest match descendants could find in Virginia was a Peebler family in the Shenandoah Valley.

Bibler researchers had difficulty accepting the "V" in the middle of the name. Some Peavler researchers had some problems accepting "Peebler" after discovering that the actual spelling was Bibler.

A generation earlier brothers Johann Frantz and Friedrich Bibler had arrived in America aboard the same ship. Frantz lived at least until about 1757, but records have not come to light after a 1754 Philadelphia Gazette ad and his fate is unknown. Two sisters, Albertina and Rosina were married in Germantown and Philadelphia. Friedrich married and had two children baptized in eastern Pennsylvania prior to his disappearing into thin air. Coinciding closely with the disappearance of Friedrich Bibler and his wife, Maria, and children Peter and Magdalena was the appearance from nowhere of a man named Frederick Peebler and his wife Mary, whose children were named Magdalena Peveler, Peter Peveler, and Michael Peebler.

The Frederick Peebler family shows us that the letter "B" can be replaced with a "V" during the process of the Anglicization of an German name. We already know that Bibler was repeatedly spelled "Peebler" in Virginia records despite the retention of the German spelling by Lewis and Jacob Bibler.

Some damage and confusion has been done by a particular Peavler researcher who twisted facts to suit their theories and despite contact with Bibler researchers and the knowledge that Johann Frantz Bibler had recorded the birth in a book that had passed through the family for generations, insisted that Lewis Bibler was actually his siblings' father with an unknown first wife, and his own children's father from his marriage to the only wife he is known to have had. Numerous facts had to be twisted, and an older and younger Lewis Bibler created to explain the presence on a militia roll of a Lewis Bibler who couldn't have been old enough to have been his siblings' father.

Various surnames known not to have been Biblers were added to stretch and touch otherwise unreachable conclusions. None of this would need mention, but this research has penetrated Peavler genealogy causing uncertainty among anyone trying to put the family together again. With scant records and hard to find solutions added to little knowledge of the Bibler family, Peavler family members bought into parts of this story. We will now have to figure out which pieces of the puzzle are imaginary and which are real. Alice Du Pont will join us later to help untangle this mess.
 
Christian Heinrich Bibler
 
23 Secrétaire aux anciennes usines Solvay de Château-Salins (57).
Catholique 
Eugène Bibler
 
24 In 1754, a Philadelphia Gazette ad warned that Francis Bibler of Philadelpha refused to pay a bond that had been obtained from himself and Michael Bibler, now deceased.

The last piece of evidence that has been located indicates that Frantz resided in Philadelphia in 1754. Frantz's parents were in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania at the time of his father's death in 1753, and his brother Friedrich and sister Rosina lived near enough Philadellphia to marry there throughout the 1750's. In 1760 a typhus epidemic left a large number of Philadelphia's residents dead.

So far, research of Virginia records do not provide any evidence that Frantz lived anywhere near his sons and daughter, all of whom appear to have moved to the Shenandoah Valley before the Revolutionary War. Present Page Co., VA, the area where, shortly after having reached the age of majority, oldest son Ludwig was allowed a warrant for land in 1766, experienced Indian raids during the mid 1760's so severe that the settlements were deserted for the safety of civilization, which to many of the pioneers, was among their Swiss Mennonite Brethren in Lancaster Co., PA.

The proximity of time of Lewis's warrant to the Indian massacres near the property he intended to purchase makes it plausible that the family had been in the valley prior to the raids, which left a number of dead. It also creates a possiblity that they migrated to Virginia among those returning home when the violence had calmed.

The fact that Lewis, not Frantz, had obtained property in Virginia that he would later divide equally among his three brothers and himself for a small percentage of its worth may indicate that Frantz was deceased by 1766.

It should also be noted that although land could be purchased by most who could afford to buy it, naturalization was required to sell the same property or leave property as a legacy to one's heirs. British colonies in North America, though loyal to the Crown, were governed separately, and naturalization in Pennsylvania could not be carried to Virginia. Lewis Bibler was a young man at the time he left Pennsylvania and if bound, may have only recently become free. It is unlikely he was naturalized in Pennsylvania. As a potential landowner in Virginia, though, he surely would have wanted to protect the family's investment by making an effort to become naturalized, more likely before than after purchasing the large estate which, regardless of Frantz's status, did represent years of hardship, and had cost the family dearly. A large number of German settlers became naturalized in Virginia in 1765. Though there is no evidence to date to prove or disprove it, an adult son buying property on behalf of a father who had not become naturalized was not as rare as it may seem, particularly if the father was unable to travel due to age or infirmity.

This note must end as it began. Frantz Bibler was living in the vicinity of Philadelphia in 1754. We know no more. 
Frantz (Johann Franciscus / Francis) Bibler
 
25 Pendant la deuxième guerre mondiale a connu la déportation en Sibérie (à confirmer).
Profession : Chef pontier sur le Rhin à Rhinau. 
Gérard Bibler
 
26 LDS 400448 :
1751
die 17 febr. moribundorum sacramentis praemunita pie in Domino obiit et die 18 sepulta est Barbara, Leonardi Bibler civis in Schwanh.

eodem obiit et sepultus adolescens Joannes Georgius prefati Leonardi Bibler legitimus filius. 
Johann Georg Bibler
 
27 Joseph's middle name may have been Pence. Joseph Bibler
 
28 Tile manufacturer (Tuilier/Ziegler) Leonard Bibler
 
29 Lewis Bibler was christened "Andreas Ludwig" Bibler. His father's older brother had been named Johann Ludwig; this Ludwig may have been named for his uncle Ludwig. Andreas was also likely a family name, but the origin of this name is not obvious at this date. Lewis (Andreas Ludwig) Bibler
 
30 Lewis's tombstone was found in the Richard Garrison yard in the Hillandale subdivision during the 1960's and was at that time read "Lewis W. Bibler." Since the tombstone is now unavailable or at a yet to be discovered location, we have been unable view it to see if perhaps the "W" in LeWis or LudWig may have been mistaken for a middle initial. It is now known that Lewis Bibler was baptized "Andreas Ludwig," causing the "W" to be viewed with even more skepticism than it had been in the past.

A more precise death date is given for Lewis in an Ancestral File, but the origin of this date is unknown by this writer at this time. Some of the research that was submitted to the Ancestral File is known to have originated with Martha Morgan and Ethyl Headly-Hummer.

Another tombstone is said to have said ?Barbara Bre---,? while another in the same location was unmarked. The Hillandale subdivision is on the farm where Lewis Bibler and his family resided during the late 1780?s through the 1790?s, now urban, but at that time between Harrisonburg and Dayton, Virginia.
 
Lewis (Andreas Ludwig) Bibler
 
31 Although we have not yet found evidence of Johann Ludwig as an adult, German naming custom tells us that he would have been called "Ludwig" later in life. (DS) Ludwig (Johann Ludwig) Bibler
 
32 The Family History Library (FHL) microfilm of the Adelsheim Lutheran Church register was reviewed by Carol Brown, who reported that although she was unable to locate a death entry for Johann Ludwig, the film contains some pages through which the ink appears to have bled; these pages were difficult to read, if not illegible. The majority of Ludwig's siblings died young and it is quite possible he did, too. It is also possible that he lived to adulthood and left home, possibly married, by the time of his parents' and siblings' departure for America. (DS)  Ludwig (Johann Ludwig) Bibler
 
33 Mary was a resident of Pleasant Township, Fairfield County, Ohio at the time of her death. It is reasonable to think that she probably died at her home, but also possible that she died at a child's home in Fairfield County. Mary (Maria) Bibler
 
34 ///Debbie?s NOTE TO FELLOW RESEARCHERS: This is not going to stay here in its entirety. Neil has edited a version of it. I also wrote about the same subject in some length in another note. I plan to consolidate them and write a section about Anglicization for the histories if we ever get the links fixed! This is a subject with big misunderstanding and it causes a lot of problems. I will search again when the time comes, but I have NEVER seen a good reference on the topic. As often as I would like to look it up, I might as well find something, even if I wrote it myself\\\

Michael's name is spelled "Bübler," in some church records. His death record, perhaps a version in English in which a b could be confused with an ?H,? at Trinity Lutheran has caused some Bühler (Beeler, etc.) descendants to claim Michael Bühler, a tailor of Adelsheim, as their ancestor.

While the name Bühler and Bübler may look alike in poorly printed material, the two names are not phonetically similar. The reason names become distorted as they change from one language to another is not because they are mistaken in an index here or there. The occurrence of Anglicization of names is a result of speakers of different languages pronouncing letters of the alphabet differently. Even citizens of a different part of the same country who speak the same language have different dialects. A German-speaking person in an English-speaking world is usually going to change either the pronunciation or the spelling of a name, but this is not a random change.

Some German alphabetical symbols don't even occur in English, and many that do don't sound alike. The fact that an "H" is a completely different, softer sound made with one's breath through an open mouth than a "B," which cannot be made without closing one's mouth and making somewhat of a popping sound, rules out any theory that may be raised to suggest this, in my opinion (DS).

If the "H" in "Bühler" were to go away, which it has many times, it would not sound like a "B." It would logically become exactly what it did become ? a silent letter representing the sound of a breath of air. Bühler families now spell their names "Bealor," "Beelor," "Beeler," and other variations. The letter "B" is very commonly mistaken for "P," even in German records, and we can hear it in the accent of those who speak German as their first language. The former name "Bühler" is sometimes found in American records with the spelling, "Peeler.? Personally, this writer has never examined the name to know whether it stuck. One would imagine it did in some cases.

The many words written above express a simple concept. Written names change to accommodate the spoken word, and did so often during the "Palatine" Immigration. Along with the challenge of differences in the sounds of different letters of the alphabet already described, two more difficulties existed that aren't common today: Although many of our Germanic ancestors were literate, the literacy rate was much lower than now, and many more of them couldn't spell their own names. To make matters worse, the letters of the German alphabet were written in a different handwriting style that most Englishmen could not read.

The identity of Michael Bübler who fell into a well in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 1753 has been determined. Although many still believe that he was a "Bühler," numerous primary documents prove he was not.

Unfortunately, like the Bühlers, another family -- The Peeblers -- Have, made some sort of sense of "B's" and "H's" somehow sounding similar enough for one to evolve into the other. Ancestry.com has followed their lead and states as a fact that Peebler is an Anglicized version of Bühler.

Years of searching for Friedrich Bibler, Michael Bibler's son, have, though not concluded, strongly indicate that it was no coincidence that after Friedrich Bibler disappeared with his wife Mary, a son Peter and a daughter Magdalena, a Frederick Peebler appeared with a wife and children with the very same names. Not only did Friedrich and his family drop off the earth ... As the nineteenth century approached, Michael Bibler's grandson Christian disappeared from the Shenandoah Valley. Soon afterward a Christian Peavler made appearances in some records in Washington County, Virginia near some of Christian Bibler's old neighbors from Shenandoah. Of course, at least one researcher has concluded that the Peelers in some records are the Peavlers.

It seems a more drastic change when a "B" becomes a "V," but we do know that while one of Frederick Peebler's sons' descendants became known as Peebler, another's acquired the spelling "Peveler." Just as there is no doubt of Michael Bibler's identity, there is no doubt that the name Bibler is spelled "Peebler" most of the time in Virginia records.

The name "Bibler" today, pronounced "in English" with a short "I" -- The sound has changed. The family kept the spelling.
 
Michael (Johann Michel / Bubler) Bibler,
 
35 Debra D. Smith and Frederick S. Weiser translated Michael Bibler's death record at Trinity Lutheran Church as follows:

Johann Michael Bübler, a tailor, from Vestenberg, born November 23, 1680, resided in Adelsheim and was married 45 years. Unfortunately fell into the well and drowned August 15, 1753. The next day he was buried honorably with a funeral sermon.

Debra D. Smith; Frederick S. Weiser, _Trinity Luther an Church Records Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Vol. 1 1730-1767 _ (Apollo, PA: Closson Press, 1995)
 
Michael (Johann Michel / Bubler) Bibler,
 
36 Michael Bibler fell into a well and drowned.  Michael (Johann Michel / Bubler) Bibler,
 
37 Michael was LIKELY to have been baptized in a Lutheran church at or near Vestenberg. The word "von" written in Michael's marriage record suggests that his father resided in Vestenberg prior to his MixhWL'Adeath. In the death entry at Trinity Lutheran Church at Lancaster, Lancaster Co., PA

A baptismal entry for Michael Bibler has not been uncovered, though, by April of 2009. date. The place of likely "christening" noted is speculation based on the naming, by the pastor,location of his birth as it was recorded in his death entry in the Trinity Lutheran Church book in Lancaster County, PA, and the place reported to be Michael's fathers late residence in Michael's marriage record in the Lutheran record at Adelsheim. 
Michael (Johann Michel / Bubler) Bibler,
 
38 Rosina (Bibler) Diehl may possibly be identical with the Rosina Diehl who died in Reading Twp., Berks Co. PA on 4 Jun 1788. A widow, her estate was administered by Chrisian Barrenstein, a friend. She was evidently the widow of John Diehl who died intestate in Reading Twp. on 6 Jan 1785 as the administration of his estate was given to his widow, Rosina. Rosina (Maria Christina Rosina) Bibler
 
39 20 Nov 1791, or 20 Oct 1791 ? Peter (Johann Peter, Jean Pierre) Bibler (Biebler)
 
40 Tuilier Peter (Johann Peter, Jean Pierre) Bibler (Biebler)
 
41 naiss. 20 Mess. Andreas Biebler
 
42 Décédée "d'accès pernicieux" (Malaria) Barbara Biebler
 
43 Décédée en couche Barbara Sophia Biebler
 
44 Cultivateur, Tuilier Georg Biebler
 
45 naiss. 4 Therm. Johann Georg Biebler
 
46 Tuilier, Catholique Johann Ignatius (Ignaz, Ignace, Jacques, Nazareth) Biebler
 
47 Catholique Joseph Biebler
 
48 Catholique, Tuilier adjoint Joseph Biebler
 
49 Domestique,
Célibataire 
Joseph Biebler
 
50 Tuilier Theobald Biebler
 

      1 2 Next»